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First-Degree Burns

What is a first-degree burn?

First-degree burns affect only the epidermis, or outer layer of skin. The burn site is red, painful, dry, and with no blisters. Mild sunburn is an example. Long-term tissue damage is rare and usually consists of an increase or decrease in the skin color.

What causes a first-degree burn?

In most cases, first-degree burns are caused by the following:

  • mild sunburn

  • flash burn - a sudden, brief burst of heat

What are the symptoms of a first-degree burn?

The following are the most common signs and symptoms of a first-degree burn. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

  • redness

  • dry skin

  • skin that is painful to touch

  • pain usually lasts 48 to 72 hours and then subsides

  • peeling skin

The symptoms of a first-degree burn may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Consult your child's physician for a diagnosis.

Treatment for first-degree burns:

Specific treatment for a first-degree burn will be determined by your child's physician, based on the following:

  • your child's age, overall health, and medical history

  • extent of the burn

  • location of the burn

  • cause of the burn

  • your child's tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies

  • your opinion or preference

First-degree burns usually heal on their own within a week. Treatment may depend on the severity of the burn and may include the following:

  • cold compresses

  • lotion or ointments

  • acetaminophen or ibuprofen 

First-degree burns are usually not bandaged. Consult your child's physician for additional treatment for first-degree burns.

Medical Reviewer: [Akin, Louise RN BSN, Jenkins, Lee] Last Annual Review Date: 2011-06-01T00:00:00-06:00 Copyright: Copyright © 2007 Staywell Content Services, Inc. except where otherwise noted.

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