Type 2 Diabetes and Food Choices

You make food choices every day. Whole wheat or white bread? A side of french fries or fresh fruit? Eat now or later? Choices about what, when and how much you eat affect your blood glucose. Understanding how food affects blood glucose is the first step in managing diabetes. And following a diabetes meal plan can help keep you on track.

Prevent problems

Having type 2 diabetes means that your body doesn’t control blood glucose well. When blood glucose stays too high for too long, serious health problems can develop. By controlling your blood glucose through diet, exercise and medication, you can delay or prevent kidney, eye and heart disease, and other complications of diabetes.


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Indications and Usage for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and children (6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Tell your doctor about other medicines and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Please click here or the link below for the full prescribing information for Lantus®

US.GLA.13.04.229 © 2014 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC, A SANOFI COMPANY


Control carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are foods that have the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels. After you eat carbohydrates, your blood glucose rises. Fruit, sweet foods, starchy foods such as bread, potatoes and corn, and milk and milk products contain carbohydrates. Although carbohydrates are important for health, when you eat too many at once, your blood glucose can go too high.

Some carbohydrates -- potatoes, sweets and white bread, for instance -- may raise blood glucose more than others. Better choices are less processed foods with more fiber and nutrients, such as 100 percent whole wheat bread, oatmeal, brown rice and non-starchy vegetables.

Food and medicine

Insulin helps glucose move from the blood into your muscle cells, where it can be used for energy. Some oral diabetes medications help you produce more insulin or help your insulin work better, so your medications and food plan have to work together. If you take insulin shots, you need to be especially careful to match the amount of carbohydrates you eat with your insulin dose. If you consume too many carbohydrates without adjusting your insulin dose, your blood glucose might go too high. If you consume too few carbohydrates, your blood glucose might go too low. Your provider or a dietitian can help you match your food choices to your medication.

Eat at regular times

You can manage your blood glucose better if you eat the same amount of food at the same time every day. That keeps your glucose levels stable and helps your medication work best. Physical activity is an important way to control blood glucose, too. Try to exercise at the same time every day. That way you can build the extra calories you need for exercise into your meal plan.

Eat smart

You can eat the same foods as everyone else, but you have to pay attention to certain details. That’s where your diabetes meal plan comes in. An individualized meal plan tells you the time of day to eat meals and snacks, the types of food to eat and how much. It should include your favorite foods and emphasize these healthy foods:

  • Whole grains, such as 100 percent whole wheat bread, brown rice and oatmeal

  • Nonfat or low-fat dairy products, such as nonfat milk and yogurt

  • Lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, and dried beans and peas

  • Fruits and vegetables

At first, it’s helpful to use measuring cups and spoons to make sure you’re consuming the amount of food that’s in your plan. By checking your blood glucose one to two hours after eating, you can learn how your food choices affect your blood glucose.

To develop a diabetes meal plan or change a plan that’s not working for you, see a diabetes educator or dietitian. Having a meal plan that you can live with will keep you at your healthy best.


Medical Reviewer: Jones, Niya, MD, Fraser, Marianne, MSN, RN Last Annual Review Date: 2012-05-23 Copyright: © Health Ink & Vitality Communications

Reference: Diabetes section on Better Medicine


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