Bipolar Disorder Facts

Bipolar disorder is characterized by periodic episodes of extreme elation, elevated mood or irritability (also called mania) countered by periodic, classic depressive symptoms. Learn more about bipolar disorder ›

Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder (Manic Depression)

Manic depression, also known as bipolar disorder, is classified as a type of affective disorder or mood disorder that goes beyond the day's ordinary ups and downs, and is a serious medical condition and important health concern in this country. Manic depression is characterized by periodic episodes of extreme elation, elevated mood, or irritability (also called mania) countered by periodic, classic depressive symptoms.

Depression is a mood disorder that involves a person's body, mood, and thoughts. It can affect and disrupt eating, sleeping, or thinking patterns, and is not the same as being unhappy or in a "blue" mood, nor is it a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely "pull themselves together" and get better. Treatment is often necessary and many times crucial to recovery.

Learn more about the symptoms of bipolar disorder

Could It Be Bipolar Disorder?

The symptoms of bipolar disorder include intense mood swings from euphoria to depression.

Treatment for Bipolar Disorder

Manic depression, also known as bipolar disorder, is classified as a type of affective disorder or mood disorder that goes beyond the day's ordinary ups and downs, and is a serious medical condition and important health concern in this country. Manic depression is characterized by periodic episodes of extreme elation, elevated mood, or irritability (also called mania) countered by periodic, classic depressive symptoms.

Depression is a mood disorder that involves a person's body, mood, and thoughts. It can affect and disrupt eating, sleeping, or thinking patterns, and is not the same as being unhappy or in a "blue" mood, nor is it a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed or wished away. People with a depressive illness cannot merely "pull themselves together" and get better. Treatment is often necessary and many times crucial to recovery.

Learn more about treatments for bipolar disorder

Living with Bipolar Disorder

  • Are there recent postings by different people? The online group should have postings from more than a few people.

  • Are people truly helping one another? Questions and requests for help are best answered by members who can share their positive experiences, strengths, and hope.

  • Are the members caring? Postings should be friendly and positive. There should be rules against abusive language.

  • Can you relate to the group? Different online groups have different intentions and levels of feeling. If a group isn’t on your wavelength, try another.

  • Is the site advertising a product as a cure? Be wary of those that do.

Getting the Most from a Mental Health Support Group

Your Guide to Bipolar Disorder


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Bipolar symptoms are hard to recognize because they're the same as the everyday ups and downs we all feel.